Botanical Harvest: Cottonwood (Populus spp.)

In the cold of winter, the cottonwoods keep spring wrapped up tight -- little buds waiting for just the right warmth to unfurl tiny perfect leaves.  You can smell their opening before you see it.  A dripping resinous, lush and honeyed smell like sun-warmed earth and new green things.  You might be tempted to call it the smell of spring itself.

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Botanical Harvest: Greasewood (Larrea tridentate)

Greasewood (Larrea tridentate) also known as chaparral, la gobenadora, creosote, or shegoi, is a love poem to survival.  Common to the Chihuahuan, Sonoran and Mojave deserts, greasewood thrives where little else can survive, shaping to a situation, becoming what is needed.

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Botanical Harvest: Honey Mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa)

Honey Mesquite is one of our all-time favorite “noxious” plants.  (It is thought to compete with rangelands, much to the dismay of ranchers.)  Its pods taste like brown sugar and make delicious cookies, it puts nitrogen into the soil, can survive on very little water, has an awesomely long phreatophytic taproot that pumps groundwater to dry surface soils and bees love it. (If we could only be this cool… )

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